How Telemedicine Is Transforming Health Care

By MELINDA BECKColumnist, The Wall Street Journal.

After years of big promises, telemedicine is finally living up to its potential.

Driven by faster internet connections, ubiquitous smartphones and changing insurance standards, more health providers are turning to electronic communications to do their jobs—and it’s upending the delivery of health care.

Doctors are linking up with patients by phone, email and webcam. They’re also consulting with each other electronically—sometimes to make split-second decisions on heart attacks and strokes. Patients, meanwhile, are using new devices to relay their blood pressure, heart rate and other vital signs to their doctors so they can manage chronic conditions at home.

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Skin-related disorders and Curcumin

Curcumin, or diferuloylmethane, is a crystalline compound which gives the East Asian spice turmeric its bright yellow color. The medicinal properties of this spice have been referenced in numerous countries and cultures throughout the world. Today, there is growing scientific evidence suggesting curcumin’s utility in the treatment of chronic pain, inflammatory dermatoses, acceleration of wound closure, skin infections, as well as cosmetic ailments such as dyspigmentation.

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DermUtopia Named a Top Telemedicine Site

You know you should see a dermatologist for rashes, moles, acne, and other skin conditions. However, fitting a visit to the dermatologist into your busy schedule can be difficult. Telemedicine is making it easier for people to receive care for their skin conditions.

Telemedicine allows you to visit the dermatologist quickly and for a relatively low cost. You can have a doctor review your skin condition without leaving your home. Simply submit a list of your symptoms and photos of the affected area through your computer, smartphone, or tablet. In most cases, you’ll hear back with a treatment plan within a few days.

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FDA Warns AD/HD Patch Can Lead To Permanent Skin Color Loss

Medscape (6/25, Brooks) report that the FDA issued a warning Wednesday that Noven Therapeutics, Inc.’s Daytrana (methylphenidate), a patch for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), “may cause permanent skin color loss.” According to the FDA, “postmarketing reports of acquired skin depigmentation or hypopigmentation of the skin, consistent with chemical leukoderma, have been associated with the use of the Daytrana patch.” The condition is not physically harmful, but it is disfiguring. In response, the FDA “has added a new warning to the drug label to indicate the risk for chemical leukoderma.”

The Pharmacy Times (6/25, Allikas) reports that there have been 51 “chemical leukoderma cases reported to the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).” Healio (6/25) also covers the story.

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